POST 92: THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IMMIGRATION POLICIES IN 2021 BUDGET ARE DISAPPOINTING

POPULATION RESEARCH WA IS DISAPPOINTED BY THE LACK OF SMART IMMIGRATION POLICIES IN THE 2021 BUDGET – WE START WITH NET OVERSEAS MIGRATION

The Covid 19 related pause in Australia’s rapid migration program – gave the Morrison government more than enough time to reflect on the huge impacts caused by Australia’s drastically high levels of net overseas migration (NOM) over the past 15 years.

Unfortunately, their immigration policy response in the 2021 budget is woeful. Instead of changing the policy settings to enable a sensible migration intake. Federal Treasury has opted for high NOM levels over 200,000 in 2023 and 2024.

These historically high amounts of NOM have had major impacts on Australia’s cities, suburbs, environs, quality of life, jobs, and culture.

Australian citizens are acutely aware of that.

Over the past 15 years, net overseas migration has contributed to more than 60% of population growth.

The Federal Government in Canberra are revealing disconnect from Australian citizens.

The Federal government  is demonstrating an appalling lack of awareness of Australian citizens’ concerns with mass migration.

A growing number of respected Australian commentators and economists are pressing Federal Treasury to plan for fewer migrants. But this has been ignored. How long can the Morrison government hold onto their failed immigration policy?

Irresponsible immigration policy implemented for over a decade and a half has had a number of adverse effects, including contributing to low wages growth.

Clearly the pressure is growing for a return to long term average net overseas migration, of less than 100,000.

Graph 1 below demonstrates the average is slightly over 90,000 people per year from 1925 to 2020.

(Source Australia Bureau of Statistics, National, state and territory population, 18/03/2021: Historical population, Released 18/04/2019)

Note: The net overseas migration for 2020 is for the year ending September 2020, all others are for year ending December.

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